Ends on April 6, 2017$28.00
$28.00
APPLICATION PROCESS
Please submit the following information:

  • Letter of intent indicating your interest in a residency at The Clay Studio of Missoula
  • 15 high quality digital images of your work - Images should be submitted as high quality jpgs (approx. 8 x 5” at 300 dpi). Label images with applicants last name and image number (example: lastname1.jpg)
  • Image inventory sheet with title, corresponding number, date, medium and dimensions
  • Resume
  • Contact information of 3 people who can speak to your qualifications as a potential resident. (List their name, affiliation,phone number, and email address)

About the Residency
Established in 2003, the residency program at the Clay Studio of Missoula is designed to encourage the creative, intellectual and personal growth of emerging and established visual artists. A studio residency is an ideal opportunity for a developing artist who is looking for a place to pursue focused work while gaining important technical skills and teaching experience. Residents should be enthusiastic and dedicated to their artwork, enjoy working with other people in a community studio setting and have working knowledge of the ceramic medium. Previous experience working in a ceramics studio is strongly preferred.

The Clay Studio of Missoula residencies range from one to six months (short-term) to up to two years (long-term). We will host up to five long-term residents. We have recently added a Community Residency program to accommodate artists interested in working in Missoula for one month or less. The Clay Studio’s director and a selection committee choose new residents annually in the spring. The selections are based on the quality of the work, its artistic merit, and the diversity of the prospective group in terms of work, background, and stage of career development. Long-term residents are initially granted a one-year residency, and are given the opportunity to extend into a second year with Board approval.

Residency expectations
The Clay Studio expects that each resident will contribute approximately 5 hours a week in studio maintenance. The 5 self-directed hours working for the Clay Studio per week may include such tasks as loading and firing kilns, making clay and glazes, unloading material deliveries, cleaning and organizing the studio, repairing equipment, assisting with studio improvements, and performing other duties as needed. Residents are also asked to assist with the production of fundraising events and are often called upon to offer technical or creative advice to Studio Artists, Interns, and students.

Studio
Residents are assigned a dedicated, semi-private studio space to work in for the duration of their residency (approximately 125 sq. ft.), and receive 24-hour access to the Clay Studio facilities. Residents are responsible for their own studio tools, housing and transportation, and kiln and material fees (at cost). Resident artists are encouraged to teach classes as a way to share their knowledge and experiences, as well as to interact with our local Missoula community.

Wood Fire Residency
While any Clay Studio resident may fire the wood kiln, the Clay Studio of Missoula maintains one residency opportunity dedicated to a year-long wood fire residency. This opportunity may also be extended into a second year with Board approval. Interested applicants should have a strong, developed body of work; have previous experience firing wood kilns; feel comfortable directing firings; possess a strong work ethic, and have a desire to work within a community setting.

The Clay Studio of Missoula’s wood fire program is popular with both students and members, and the wood fire resident plays an important role in maintaining and developing this program. Expected tasks include teaching classes on wood firing, managing the wood firing community, acting as the contact to our wood suppliers, managing kiln maintenance, implementing safety policies, and supervising community and class firings. In exchange, firing fees for the wood kiln are generally waived for the wood fire resident. Time spent managing the wood fire program will account for some but not all of the wood fire resident’s hours contributed to helping to run a successful community studio.